The product would thus be fresh from the anvil, or as Shakespeare put it in ‘Twelfth Night,’ ‘fire-new.’” ( by Robert Hendrickson, Facts on File, New York, 1997).

encyclopedia of appalachia online dating-28

It is chiefly southern Appalachian and can mean self-assertive, headstrong, foppish, overbearing. A visitor to this page -- Lesa, whose family is from Union, W. -- reports that her family used "bungfuzzled" to mean "completely confused about something."Cherry Creek dip is a section of road in Raleigh County.

“Dictionary of American Regional English,” Volume 1 by Frederic G. If you drive slow there at night, a ghost will get in your car. The ghost was a person killed in a wreck and won't stay in a speeding car.

“The mere fact that these…balloons had ‘gone up’ would signal that some form of action was imminent.” War Slang: American Fighting Words and Phrases from the Civil War to the War in Iraq, Second Edition, by Paul Dickson, 2007, First Bristol Park Books, New York. If a spouse commits adultery, the innocent party may get a divorce and remarry without religious censure.

A person who divorces on grounds other than adultery and marries again is considered by some to be committing adultery with the new spouse.

Horace Kephart said “biggety” was “negro lingo.” (I can testify that it was also used by white folks in Raleigh County, W.

Va.) “Smoky Mountain Voices: A Lexicon of Southern Appalachian Speech Based on the Research of Horace Kephart,” edited by Harold J. Karl Nicholas (University Press of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky., 1993). A meal fit for a king was still called “a bite to eat.” To say otherwise was bragging.

Cassidy (1985, Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass., and London, England). “[Feisty and ] mean nigh about the same thing, only there's a differ. A version of the story is online at Our television reception was almost nonexistent -- one "regular channel" and educational TV. A friend was helping a Spanish-speaking neighbor practice her English.

When I say that Doc Jones thar is brigaty among women-folks, hit means he’s stuck on hisself and wants to show off....feisty means when a feller's allers wigglin' about, wantin' ever'body to see him, like a kid when the preacher comes..." ” “Smoky Mountain Voices: A Lexicon of Southern Appalachian Speech Based on the Research of Horace Kephart,” edited by Harold J. Karl Nicholas (University Press of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky., 1993). So in the 1960s I would on occasion spend Saturday night with my cousin Carolyn so we could watch Chiller Theater. The neighbor was standing in a doorway watching the clouds roll in.

S., the most-used term seems to be Irish goodbye, which, due to unfortunate historical stereotyping, hints that the vanished person was too tipsy to manage a proper denouement.